Dino Time and Speed Light Test - having fun with the camera.

Hollow City excerpt

An excerpt of Hollow City (the second book in the Miss Peregrine series by Ransom Riggs)is available online.  For those of you who are as excited as I am, I’m posting it below.  If you have no idea what I’m talking about, you should check out the first book: Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children.

Excerpt from Miss Peregrine 2 by QuirkBooks

Biodegradable

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I was walking down Lexington Ave a couple days ago when I heard a couple say, “those fleeces are great.  They’re biodegradable.  You can just throw them away when they get dirty.”  This couple appeared pretty affluent, which just added to my shock at hearing this.  It seems like a lot of smart people don’t understand that oxygen is needed for things to degrade, and if you throw something away then it gets buried under trash where air can’t get to it.  As this New York Times article explains, “that means that throwing the biodegradable cup into the trash is basically as bad as throwing a normal plastic cup in the trash.”  It’s science.

nprfreshair:

TODAY is the 50th Anniversary of the beloved classic Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak.  First published in 1963, it has sold more than 16 million copies worldwide.
The New York Times obituary for Maurice Sendak calls Where the Wild Things Are “simultaneously genre-breaking and career-making,” describing Sendak as being “…widely considered the most important children’s book artist of the 20th century, who wrenched the picture book out of the safe, sanitized world of the nursery and plunged it into the dark, terrifying and hauntingly beautiful recesses of the human psyche.”
One of the most talked about interviews we’ve ever done was with Maurice Sendak in 2011 shortly before he died. Sendak reflects on love, loss, and celebrating life: 

I have nothing now but praise for my life. I’m not unhappy. I cry a lot because I miss people. They die and I can’t stop them. They leave me and I love them more. … What I dread is the isolation. … There are so many beautiful things in the world which I will have to leave when I die, but I’m ready, I’m ready, I’m ready.

And if you haven’t seen it yet, The New York Times did an amazing illustration to accompany our emotional interview with Sendak. 

There’s a special section for Where The Wild Things Are at the Why Children’s Books Matter exhibit in the New York Public Library.  It’s worth checking out!

nprfreshair:

TODAY is the 50th Anniversary of the beloved classic Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak.  First published in 1963, it has sold more than 16 million copies worldwide.

The New York Times obituary for Maurice Sendak calls Where the Wild Things Are “simultaneously genre-breaking and career-making,” describing Sendak as being “…widely considered the most important children’s book artist of the 20th century, who wrenched the picture book out of the safe, sanitized world of the nursery and plunged it into the dark, terrifying and hauntingly beautiful recesses of the human psyche.”

One of the most talked about interviews we’ve ever done was with Maurice Sendak in 2011 shortly before he died. Sendak reflects on love, loss, and celebrating life:

I have nothing now but praise for my life. I’m not unhappy. I cry a lot because I miss people. They die and I can’t stop them. They leave me and I love them more. … What I dread is the isolation. … There are so many beautiful things in the world which I will have to leave when I die, but I’m ready, I’m ready, I’m ready.

And if you haven’t seen it yet, The New York Times did an amazing illustration to accompany our emotional interview with Sendak. 

There’s a special section for Where The Wild Things Are at the Why Children’s Books Matter exhibit in the New York Public Library.  It’s worth checking out!

This is one of my favorite worship songs. My favorite line: “you consider me a friend.” It’s scandalous that God humbled himself in order to have an intimate relationship with me, a sinner. It’s why His love needs to be extravagant; it’s the only thing that could allow me to escape judgement from a just God.

The Almost is hit or miss with me, but this version is SO GOOD!

(Source: Spotify)